An attempt to invalidate my own “improved” thermal imprinting procedure: 1. Macroscopic level

Yes,  here in a series of pictures, is an attempt to scorch linen so severely in my new “fabric on top” mode that folk will straight away dismiss it as invalid – producing an image with none of the subtlety of the Man on the TS. However, the cognoscenti reading this will know that linen is quite hard to scorch severely – far more so in my experience than cotton – so one has botany on one’s side, so to speak, in doing what otherwise  might be seen as a perverse exercise in model-building masochism.

Heat brass template on halogen ring

Heat brass template on halogen ring, test with swab of linen, the aim being to quickly char the latter when sufficiently hot

The template is now hot enough to use

The template is now hot enough to use

Place linen over hot template. Place a thick overlay of damp cloth on top of linen. Gently mould to contours manually, monitoring the heat transmitting through overlay.

Place linen over hot template. Place a thick overlay of damp cloth on top of linen. Gently mould to contours manually, monitoring the heat transmitting through overlay.

Peel back the linen and overlay, confirming a very prominent image on linen (darker than would be used routinely)

Peel back the linen and overlay, confirming a very prominent image on linen (darker than would be used routinely). Note that the damp overlay has been scorched on its frilly edge  – proof of “deliberate” overheating.

Comparison of template and thermal imprint

Comparison of template and thermal imprint. This image would have been dark brown, almost black, if cotton had been substituted for linen.

Close-up of image area

Close-up of image area. There has probably been some excessive distortion of the arms in this experiment, due to excessive contact time and attendant moulding around the relief.

The same image after uploading to ImageJ and applying Edit Invert (the modern-day equivalent of the famed Secondo Pia conversion of negative to photograph-like pseudo-positive).

The same image after uploading to ImageJ and applying Edit Invert (the modern-day equivalent of the famed Secondo Pia conversion of negative to photograph-like pseudo-positive). Sorry about the  loose  linen thread.

As above, after appling 3D enhancement. This image did not respond well, but that may be due to a lot of relief in a very small area, making it impossible for the thick overlay to mould itself and linen to the intricate relief.

As above, after applying 3D enhancement.
This image did not respond well, but that may be due to a lot of relief in a very small area, making it impossible for the thick overlay to mould itself and linen to the intricate relief.

The final step was to snip off some of the arm image for examination under the microscope. How seevere is the scorching? Are there burned semi-carbonized as distinct from lightly scorched threads and fibres. How do the fields compare with those of the TS under the microscope (Mark Evans pictures)?

The final step was to snip off some of the arm image for examination under the microscope. How severe is the scorching? Are there burned semi-carbonized features  as distinct from lightly scorched threads and fibres? How do the fields compare with those of the TS under the microscope (Mark Evans pictures)?

The microscopy is to be the subject of a separate posting, to follow on from this shortly.

Update: now added. Click on link below to see the appearance of that intensely-scorched arm area under the microscope. Do the fibres look “charred” or merely coloured/roasted/scorched etc – as might be the various descriptions of the Shroud image?

An attempt to invalidate my own “improved” thermal imprinting procedure: 2. Microscopic level

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About Colin Berry

Retired science bod, previous research interests: phototherapy of neonatal jaundice, membrane influences on microsomal UDP-glucuronyltransferase, defective bilirubin and xenobiotic conjugation and hepatic excretion, dietary fibre and resistant starch.
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