My hypothesized link between the Shroud of Turin and the Templar executions is reinforced – via the Lirey badge and its reverse-side diamond trellis.

 

 

Postscript (correction: ‘prescript‘) added July 2019:

You have arrived at a 2014 posting. That was the year in which this investigator finally abandoned the notion of the body image being made by direct scorch off a heated metal template (despite many attractions, like negative image, 3D response etc. But hear later: orchestral DA DA!  Yup, still there with the revised technology! DA DA! ).

In its place came two stage image production.

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Stage 1: sprinkle white wheaten flour or suchlike vertically onto human subject from head to foot, front and rear  (ideally with initial smear of oil to act as weak adhesive). Shake off excess flour, then cover the lightly coated subject with wet linen. Press down VERTICALLY and firmly (thus avoiding sides of subject). Then (and here’s the key step):

Stage 2: suspend the linen horizontally over glowing charcoal embers and roast gently until the desired degree of coloration, thus ‘developing’ the flour imprint, so as to simulate a sweat-generated body image that has become yellowed with centuries of ageing.

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The novel two-stage “flour-imprinting’ technology was unveiled initially on my generalist “sciencebuzz” site. (Warning: one has to search assiduously to find it, and it still uses a metal template, albeit unheated,  as distinct from human anatomy):

 

sbuzz oct 24, 14 flour 1

 

So it’s still thermal development of sorts, but with a key difference. One can take imprints off human anatomy (dead or alive!).

A final wash of the roasted flour imprint with soap and water yields a straw-coloured nebulous image, i.e. with fuzzy, poorly defined edges. It’s still a negative (tone-reversed) image that responds to 3D-rendering software, notably the splendid freely-downloadable ImageJ.  (Ring any bells? Better still, orchestral accompaniment – see , correction HEAR earlier – DA DA!))

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This 2014 “prescript” replaces the one used for my earlier 2012/2013 postings, deploying abandoned ‘direct scorch’ technology.

Thank you for your patience and forbearance. Here’s where the original posting started:

Original posting starts here:

 

 

Here’s the reverse side  (1) of the Lirey Pilgrim’s badge, the front side  (2) showing  a man (not obviously Christ-like)  in Turin Shroud configuration).

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Important – click on image to ENLARGE.

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Now look at this picture of the Templars being prepared for slow-roasting:

Jacques de Molay, last Grand Master, Knights Templar,1309.

Jacques de Molay, last Grand Master, Knights Templar, Paris, 1314

Diamond trellis in more homely setting.

Diamond trellis in more homely setting.

Now look at this picture of St. Lawrence of Rome next to the  gridiron,  the one  on which he was slow-roasted. Note the diamond trellis (and compare with the Lirey badge above – first picture).

 

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Note the up-market iron grid in the picture, with its diamond trellis.

 

Then look at the man on the Lirey badge: note the coiled rope (or chain) like objects which  Ian Wilson describes as blood belt – an NT-friendly narrative (but true?).

Lirey pilgrim's badge, depicting the Man on the TS (left) and Arthur Forgeais drawing right. Note the unexpected coil-like features (red arrows) which Ian Wilson interprested as a "blood belt" from a side wound with lance, as per NT account of Christ's crucifixion, which I interpreted in 2012 as a chain used to secure a victim for burning at the stake. That opinion is now revised in the light of the depictions of the martyrdom of St.Lawrence of Rome.

Lirey pilgrim’s badge, depicting the Man on the TS (left) and Arthur Forgeais drawing right. Note the unexpected coil-like features (red arrows) which Ian Wilson interprested as a “blood belt” from a side wound with lance, as per NT account of Christ’s crucifixion, which I interpreted in 2012 as a chain used to secure a victim for burning at the stake. That opinion is now revised in the light of the depictions of the martyrdom of St.Lawrence of Rome.

Then look at the roasting of the naked hands-over-groin area St.Lawrence of his gridiron (AD 258, reign of Emperor Valerian):

Does not the nudity and position of the hands put you in mind of something? But this is the martyrdom of St.Lawrence of Rome  in 258 – by slow-roasting on a grill. Now look at the reverse side of the Lirey badge. What do you see? Then look at the Turin Shroud. Sheer coincidence? Maybe...

Does not the nudity and position of the hands put you in mind of something? But this is the martyrdom of St.Lawrence of Rome in 258 – by slow-roasting on a grill. Now look at the reverse side of the Lirey badge. What do you see? Then look at the Turin Shroud. Sheer coincidence? Maybe…

Then look at the Shroud of Turin:

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Apols for repetition

Am I the only one to see connections here?

Like – the man on the TS was a barbecued Knight Templar, that his manner of execution was inspired by that of St.Lawrence, that maybe a life-sized crucifix of Christ was used to make a thermal imprint as proxy for the dead Templar, that it was then a simple matter to suggest that the man shown on the TS was not a Templar, was not St.Lawrence but the real Jesus of Nazareth in his real burial shroud?

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About Colin Berry

Retired science bod, previous research interests: phototherapy of neonatal jaundice, membrane influences on microsomal UDP-glucuronyltransferase, defective bilirubin and xenobiotic conjugation and hepatic excretion, dietary fibre and resistant starch.
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