I spy (?) lifting/lowering ropes on the Lirey badge (which point to ROASTING, not CRUCIFIXION). Time to rethink the “Shroud of Turin”

Lirey pilgrim's badge, depicting the Man on the TS (left) and Arthur Forgeais drawing right. Note the unexpected coil-like features (red arrows) which Ian Wilson interprested as a "blood belt" from a side wound with lance, as per NT account of Christ's crucifixion, which I interpreted in 2012 as a chain used to secure a victim for burning at the stake. That opinion is now revised in the light of the depictions of the martyrdom of St.Lawrence of Rome.

Lirey pilgrim’s badge, depicting the Man on the TS (left) and the 1865 Arthur Forgeais drawing right. Note the unexpected coil-like features (red arrows) which historian Ian Wilson interpreted as a “blood belt” from a side wound with lance, as per NT account of Christ’s crucifixion, but which this blogger interpreted in 2012 as a chain used to secure a victim for burning at the stake. That initial impression  of mine is now revised in the light of the depictions  just discovered of the martyrdom of St.Lawrence of Rome.

And here’s the picture that caused me to change my mind, posted just a few hours ago on the previous blog, initially small format, and then enlarged (when what appeared initially to be “poking rods” by the torturers/executioners showed up as coil-like, and almost certainly a single length of rope used to raise and lower the victim.

Does not the nudity and position of the hands put you in mind of something? But this is the martyrdom of St.Lawrence of Rome  in 258 – by slow-roasting on a grill. Now look at the reverse side of the Lirey badge. What do you see? Then look at the Turin Shroud. Sheer coincidence? Maybe...

Original caption from this morning’s posting:  “Does not the nudity and position of the hands put you in mind of something? But this is the martyrdom of St.Lawrence of Rome in 258 – by slow-roasting on a grill. Now look at the reverse side of the Lirey badge. What do you see? Then look at the Turin Shroud. Sheer coincidence? Maybe…”

PS. I’d have preferred the rope held by the nearside fella to have gone over the side member of the gridiron, not under it. But you know these medieval artists – so challenged re perspective.

Possibly more to come. Must go back and take another look at the “crucifixion” paraphernalia on the border of the Lirey badge.

PS: I’ve used the term “rope” in its broadest sense. It may have been metal cable (heat-resistant). Or maybe  cable had not been invented, so they used water-soaked rope? I’ve seen another picture  (will search out) of the martyrdom with a big container at the end of the grid. Water?

Afterthought. As I said recently, I’m my own harshest critic. Coming back to that picture, there are contrary reasons for thinking it may not be a rope being worked from left to right, First, the free end behind the grip of the man on the right is rigid, not flopping down, so could be a rod of pole. Secondly what appears to be a twisted rope-like appearance might be an artefact of viewing online. The coiled effect is best seen in enlargments, making it possible it’s an artefact, though it is still visible (just) in the non-enlarged pictures. I guess it’s possible that two men are both poking their separate rigid poles at the same bit of embers near the feet , though why the artist would choose to draw the “poles” so they appear to meet as if one is anybody’s guess.

Update: Thursday Feb 13:  I’ve added a question mark to the title!

(This blog being a real time account of the way my thinking evolves, complete with wrong turnings, cul-de-sacs etc).

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About Colin Berry

Retired science bod, previous research interests: phototherapy of neonatal jaundice, membrane influences on microsomal UDP-glucuronyltransferase, defective bilirubin and xenobiotic conjugation and hepatic excretion, dietary fibre and resistant starch.
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5 Responses to I spy (?) lifting/lowering ropes on the Lirey badge (which point to ROASTING, not CRUCIFIXION). Time to rethink the “Shroud of Turin”

  1. norman says:

    check out “the linen god” on amazon if you like this sort of thing….great read.

  2. colinsberry says:

    Norman: Kindly stop using my blog to promote a novel (page-turner or otherwise) . I’ve already given a considered response to your first comment. So how about reciprocating with a comment on a comment – to prove you are more than a self-promoting author (or agent )? Blog etiquette and all that…

  3. german says:

    This is just unbelievable nonsense. The images of the medallion clearly show the weave of the shroud and why would you need chain to lower a body onto a grill?Why not place the person on the grill then start the fire,which is how they did do it.

  4. german says:

    The Turin Shroud is 100% authentic.Whether it is Jesus Christ that is another question.

    • Colin Berry says:

      I was on the point of composing a reply to your first comment, pointing out the evolution in my thinking re the TS (see my other site: http://colinb-sciencebuzz.blogspot.co.uk/ ) and even the self-doubts expressed in the posting above. However, noting this second comment, and your claimed/assumed 2000 year old provenance being “100%” certain when the radiocarbon dating says otherwise (if you think otherwise, then demand a recount!) I frankly see no point in composing a detailed response to your comments.

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